Underrated Courses in Nigerian Universities

The desire to study a lucrative course and earn big after graduation is one of the factors that determine admission seekers choice of course in tertiary institutions.

This has made some courses in Nigerian Universities to be more special than others because the courses apparently attract more admission seekers.

Undergraduates programs like Law, Medicine, Business Administration and Mass Communication are some of the most subscribed courses in Nigerian Universities

However, while most admission seekers want to have their BSc degrees in these courses, they tend to underrate and ignore certain undergraduate programs. This probably stems from the fallacy that those courses do not good career prospect.

Here are five underrated courses in Nigerian Universities

Education courses

Education courses prepare students to become teachers and lecturers, due to the perceived poor treatments of teachers in Nigeria, a lot of students would rather choose to become professionals in other popular fields than end up in classrooms.

History

History is one of those undergraduate courses with good career prospects but some people do not see reasons why someone would gain admission into a university only to study past events and their dates.

Nigerian Languages

Why would anyone wants to study his/her own language, what is there to study? This is the question Nigerian Language students usually get when asked about their courses. This explains why admission seekers often shy away from studying Nigerian Languages in Universities.

Zoology/Botany

These two courses are concerned with the study of animals and plants and they are among the most underrated course in Nigeria. This is probably due to the erroneous belief that there’s no career prospect for zoology students than to work in a zoo.

Agricultural Sciences

Despite the establishment of  Agriculture-based Universities in Nigeria, the course is still underrated. Agric students are usually referred to as farmers on campus and the popular perception is that they’ll end up becoming farmers. Who wants to be a farmer when there are white collar jobs?

Okegbemi Olusoji Festus is an Editor/Creative writer at campustori.com, A digital media Executive and a known Social Media Enthusiast.

About Okegbemi Olusoji 1068 Articles
Okegbemi Olusoji Festus is an Editor/Creative writer at campustori.com, A digital media Executive and a known Social Media Enthusiast.

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